A Day in the Life of a Billings Ovulation Method User

Have you ever wanted to know what it is like to chart with the Billings Ovulation Method? This blog attempts to give an overview of what it is like for one individual to chart with the Billings Ovulation Method (BOM) over a single cycle. I go through each day of the cycle and explain my overall charting habits. All times are just approximate. I get personal and discuss some challenges I experience with natural family planning. BOM involves tracking sensation felt at the vulva along with the visible appearance of cervical mucus as a person goes about their day to day activities.

Day 1: Record heavy bleeding. Heavy bleeding feels wet. Done! Users are not allowed to use heavier days in the Billings method when avoiding pregnancy. This is a true day one of a cycle because it was preceded by a Billings peak day.

Day 2: Record heavy bleeding. Heavy bleeding feels wet. Done!

Day 3. Record medium bleeding. Medium bleeding feels wet. Done!

Day 4: Very light bleeding. It is now possible to observe my basic infertile pattern of dry.

8am: I feel dry and see a small amount of blood.

10am: I still feel dry.

8pm: I still feel dry. I see no mucus. Sex is allowed in the evening of this day. We use this day.

Day 5: Extremely light bleeding. Technically this day is not allowed for intercourse since I used the day before and Billings method rotates alternative evenings. We use this day anyway #rulebreaker

Day 6: I feel dry. I do not see anything. I record this day as “possibly fertile” since I broke a rule and used the day before. Every day after intercourse gets this white stamp in the pre-ovulatory time of the cycle.

Day 7: My basic infertile pattern of dry is still there! I notice nothing the entire day in the bathroom and my vulva sensation is dry. Sex is allowed in the evening. I consider my evening 8pm because I go to bed around 9pm on average. We use this day.

Day 8: I feel dry all day and see nothing. However, this day is not allowed since Billings alternates days. We skip this day.

Day 9: I feel dry all day and see nothing. However, we do not use this available day because we are both tired. It happens!

Day 10:

9am: I feel a bit moist. I don’t see anything when wiping in the bathroom.

11am: Still feel moist. I do not see anything in the bathroom.

2pm: Still feel moist. I do not see anything.

4pm: Still moist. Nothing seen.

4:45pm: Walking to my car from work. Still moist!

8pm: Overall observation for the day is moist. I record it. The fertile window has opened. This is known as the point of change.

Day 11:

7am: I feel moist as soon as I walk to the bathroom. I see very scant clear mucus on the tissue.

I do not see or feel anything for the rest of the day.

8pm: Overall observation for the day is “moist, clear”

Day 12:

7am: I feel moist, but see nothing.

10am: I feel moist, but see something white.

8pm: The feeling remains the rest of the day. I record “moist, white” for the day.

Day 13:

7am: I feel dry.

11am: I still feel dry.

1pm: I feel wet sensation when walking to my office. This is a change, so I keep that in mind.

I feel damp the rest of the day. I never see anything in the bathroom. I record “wet” as the most fertile sensation that day.

Day 14:

6:30am: I immediately feel moist.

9am: I see long clear strings when wiping in the bathroom.

11am: I have a wet sensation when walking around.

3pm: I walk around my work place. I still feel moist.

5pm: I see clear strings again.

8pm: I record “wet, clear strings” on my chart.

Day 15:

7am: I feel a gush as soon as I wake up. I do not see anything in the bathroom.

9am: I see scant, clear mucus on the tissue when wiping.

11am: I feel very wet walking around my work place.

1pm: I do not see anything on the tissue.

3pm: I do not see anything on the tissue.

5pm: I feel wet sensation while making dinner.

8pm: I record “wet, clear” as my observation for the day.

Day 16:

7am: I do not feel or see anything when waking up.

9am: I still do not feel or see anything.

12pm: I go for a 20 minute walk. When I get back, I feel slippery sensation. I go to the bathroom and see copious amounts of long, clear mucus.

8pm: I felt slippery the rest of the day. I record “slippery, long clear” on the chart.

Day 17:

6am: I feel dry when waking up.

8am: I don’t see anything or feel anything.

11am: I don’t see anything or feel anything.

8pm: The day was nothing felt, nothing seen all day. I record dry. This means yesterday was my peak day because it was a changing and developing pattern ending in slippery followed by an abrupt dry up to no longer wet or slippery.

Day 18 and Day 19:

I have the same experience as day 17. I pay attention all day and observe no mucus or sensation.

Day 20:

Ovulation is expected to be over and the cervical mucus plug has re-closed for the cycle. Sex is available any time for the rest of the cycle until day one of menstruation occurs. I can chart, but it is not necessary to wait until the evening and observations are less important as sex may interfere at any time.

Day 28: I record heavy bleeding and the rules restart.

Real Talk: Diffulties / Obstacles With Billings Not Seen on the Chart

These are things that I find can be difficul in my own personal experience. I know that people in really long cycles or with other irregularities may have different issues than me.

Challenge One: Alternative evenings only can be a struggle, and it seems even harder for me right before the fertile window opens due to my mood at this time of the cycle. This follicular phase is much longer for me than my luteal phase on average, and this means alternative evenings is the rule for most of my cycle. If someone has a partner with a conflicting schedule, this can especially be offputting. I think anyone who is going to practice this method should consider whether this is practical for their lifestyle.

Challenge Two: Expected abstinence in Billings can be hard, and I have fairly short fertile windows on average. I originally practiced sympto-thermal, and I switched to Billings when I realized that overall consecutive abstinence was much less overall (for my own cycle, Billings: 9 days, Sympto-Thermal: 14+ days). I tend to break some rules still, but this is much more suitable for my fertility intentions level than sympto-thermal.

Look out for my next blog on “A Day in the Life of a Marquette User.”

Disclaimer: Do not try to learn how to chart from this post. Everyone has their own unique cycle and this is just an example of charting with Billings in a regular cycle. Please reach out to me if you would like to learn this method with me as your guide. Alternatively, you can find a teacher here.

Top 3 Fertility Awareness Mobile Charting Apps

One of the first steps many women take when starting their charting journey is downloading a period app. However, not all apps are created equal. A quick search in the app store comes up with dozens of apps. Sadly, very few of them are suitable for those using NFP or FAM. Most are just forms of the rhythm method, an unreliable from of birth control that comes up with predictions based on past cycles. My review only includes apps that allow women to track cervical mucus and basal body temperature–the two main signs in SymptoThermal Methods. I also tried to only pick apps that allowed self-interpretation. Learning how to interpret your own fertility signs is vitally important when charting.

1. Kindara

kindara2

Available on Android and iPhone.

Perk: The iPhone version allows users to share their whole chart.

Con: The Android version is known to be considerably more glitchy than the iPhone version. On Android, users can select “Share This Chart” and “With Community” to access a screen where they may screenshot their own chart.

Cost

Perk: Free Version Available

Con: Vaginal Sensation and more than four categories are extra. Premium version is $4.99 USD/month or $49.99 USD/year

 

SymptoThermal Rules Interpretation

Perk: I don’t know if Kindara has a monopoly on self-interpretation or what, but it’s one of the only apps to allow users to interpret and mark their own peak day and temperature shift. It also lets users mark their own coverline. This means that Kindara is good for those using a method like Taking Charge of Your Fertility (which has a higher coverline) and those using Sensiplan (which has a lower coverline). Lastly, Kindara has a very easy to read, clear chart. This is so important for users, and for those helping them.

Predictions

Kindara also does not predict fertile windows unless the user is trying to conceive (I recommend ignoring these even if trying to conceive. It is always best to do your own interpretations or ask an instructor if uncertain). It will predict menstruation based on average luteal phase length once it has enough data.

Other Features:

  • Users may share charts and get feedback from the community
  • Counts days past ovulation when shift is marked
  • Cervix Tracking (Height, Openness,Firmness)
  • Sex Tracking (Protected, Unprotected, Withdrawal, Insemination
  • OPK and Pregnancy Tests Tracking
  • Journal Available
  • Pairs with Wink Thermometer (syncs with the app via Bluetooth)
  • Emojis can be used in custom data

2. Fertility Friend

fertlity friend

Available on Android and iPhone 

Pro: Fertility Friend appears to work equally well on Android and iPhone

Cost

Pro: Free, paying is not necessary to be able to chart.

Con: VIP membership available starting at $9.99/month. This is a little expensive. The community sharing feature is only available to those who pay.

SymptoThermal Rules Interpretation

Perk: Coverline can be overridden under settings.  There are options to chart cervical mucus and temperatures.

Con: The app automatically interprets. For new users, this may be confusing. 

Predictions

Fertility Friend does predict fertile windows, period days, ovulation days, and a recommended test day for pregnancy. As always, users should rely on their own interpretations and get help from an instructor if needed.

Other Features:

  • Cervix Tracking (Height, Openness, Firmness)
  • Pregnancy and OPK tracking
  • Ton of Options for Mood, Health, Diet
  • Options for IVF, A.R.T., and Fertility Medication Tracking
  • Weight Data
  • Lightbox (With VIP compare photos of OPK and HPT tests)
  • Chart Overlay (Compare multiple cycles on one chart)
  • Sex Tracking (no option to differentiate unprotected versus protected)

3. OvuView

ovuview

Available on Android Only

Con: Pretty much the fact that it isn’t available on Apple products

Cost

Perk: Free (but with ads). One time payment of $4.99 to remove all ads. This is the cheapest app with the most features for custom tracking.

SymptoThermal Rules Interpretation

Perk: You can pick from multiple methods. Users may turn methods on and off.

Con: No self interpretation available. I have included it because unlike any other app that I have come across that interprets for users, the methods can be turned off. Users may play around with the methods to see if they can mark their chart according to their method’s rules. Turning off all settings would leave a chart for the user to interpret themselves even though they can’t self-mark.  Another con is that the temperature scale is very hard to read. Make sure to round or drop your temps. Ovuview may not always do this correctly.

Predictions

Ovuview predicts future fertile windows, ovulation days, and periods. Users should ignore this in favor of self-interpretation.

Other Features:

  • A ton of custom tracking like medications, moods, weight, etc.
  • Syncs with the Tempdrop device (This is wearable BBT. My review is coming soon. Full disclosure: this link earns me ten dollars if you use it to purchase the device)
  • Cool design. Users can choose their own chart colors, background, custom data colors, etc.
  • Cervix Tracking (Position, Opening, Texture)
  • OPK and Pregnancy Test Tracking
  • Fertility Monitor Tracking (None, Low, High, Peak)
  • Sex Tracking

Conclusion

There are limited options for self-interpretation when it comes to FAM apps. The three apps above are the best I’ve found when it comes to self-marking.

Look out for my next blog on how to chart using Google Sheets. I’ll be creating a Youtube video on how to do this yourself. This method of charting allows self-interpretation, custom data tracking, and users can chart on their computer or phone.

Google Sheets

chart 19

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